How to see Impossible Colours

If you’re a bit like me and you’re interested in chasing transcendental and other worldly experiences that are non-chemically induced, you might be interested in the following news.

Turns out our brains are actually capable of seeing colours that nature hasn’t shown us yet.

Ever wondered what a blue-ish yellow looks like? If you answered “green”, you are wrong! You can see what blue-ish yellow by staring at the blue and yellow image in this post, and letting your eyes cross so that both crosses appear on top of each other.

There are infact lots of colours that you haven’t seen yet. One is called “Stygian Blue” which is simultaneously both blue and black, and “Self Luminous Red” which is simultaneously red and brighter than white.

These are examples of colours that our eyes are incapable of seeing, but that can appear in our visual cortex by mixing signals between our two eyes. The following Wikipedia article contains some cool tricks that allow you to see them.

 

We Might Have Just Come a Step Closer to Solving the Mystery of Life

A popular theory in science is that life got started when a bunch of molecules randomly bumped together in a bubbling pool of water heated by a volcanic vent roughly 3.8 billion years ago. Now Some chemists at Cambridge have come close to explaining how that might have been possible:

Sciencemag.org reports:

“DNA is better known, but many researchers today believe that life on Earth got started with its cousin RNA, because that nucleic acid can act as both a repository of genetic information and a catalyst to speed up biochemical reactions. But those favoring this “RNA world” hypothesis have struggled for decades to explain how the molecule’s four building blocks could have arisen from the simpler compounds present during our planet’s early days. Now, chemists have identified simple reactions that, using the raw materials on early Earth, can synthesize close cousins of all four building blocks. The resemblance isn’t perfect, but it suggests scientists may be closing in on a plausible scenario for how life on Earth began. “

How the humble wrist-watch put humankind on the path to cyborg slavery

In the mid-1900s, at the dawn of the computer age, the excited commentators of the time described a future utopia where humankind would be freed from the need to work and would struggle to fill up the long days with enough time-eating hobbies.

This obviously has not happened….

Even though we, as a species, are quite comfortably the head-honchos of our planet, the majority of us humans still need to work pretty hard at it.

If you were to strip away humankind’s technological advances, human societies couldn’t compare with insect colonies’ amazing efficiency and coordination; thanks to insects’ inbuilt senses that detect tiny hormonal changes and pheromonal ejections, allowing them to perfectly synchronize their work. As a result, insect colonies can build amazing things with minimal resources.

Take away our gadgets, with our relatively blunted senses, humans can’t match the efficiency of our insect counterparts. But who needs antennae when we’ve got brains that can invent wrist watches and Gantt charts?

With the human invention of modern time measurement, we enabled our species to plan and build grander and more intricate projects through our vastly improved synchronisation and management of resources. The invention of mechanical clocks, due to their more convenient and reliable time-keeping, effectively enabled us to pack more into every day.

I am no troglodyte – I am hugely appreciative for the advantages that science and technology have provided. I have it to thank for the Enlightenment values that I live by, my longer and healthier life, and the sense of wonder that I feel when looking up at the stars,  knowing that I am staring into our Universe’s past.

But in all its wonder, science and technology has also helped things to turn a bit shit. Inventions and advancements when at inception looked certain to improve the quality of our lives have often become the tools of our captors.

The invention of the town clock tower in the 1500s, followed by the mass production of pocket watches in the early 1900s, were arguably the first steps in humankind’s transition into some kind of cybernetic state of permanent serfdom.

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